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Goodspeed's History of Southeast MO
City of New Madrid Biographies
The following sketches have been taken from Goodspeed's History of Southeast Missouri by Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1888.

Benton Akin
Page 886 and 887
Judge Benton Akin was born in New Madrid County, Mo., May 29, 1831. He is a son of John Akin, a native of Ireland, who, when a child, came to America with his parents and located in North Carolina, where he grew to manhood and married Sarah Walker, a native of North Carolina. John Akin and wife removed to Missouri in 1808 and located in Cape Girardeau County, where they resided for twenty years. In 1828 they came to New Madrid County and settled on a farm near New Madrid, where they resided until the death of the husband on December 18, 1841. Mrs. Akin survived until September 20, 1865. John Akin held no office except that of justice of the peace while a resident of Cape Girardeau County.

Judge Benton Akin is the youngest and only survivor of ten children - five sons and five daughters; but five grew to maturity-three sons and two daughters. He was reared on his father's farm and received a good education in the common schools, with one year at Arcadia High School. Soon after attaining his majority he purchased a farm adjoining his father's, which he still owns and cultivates. It consists of 435 acres of land under a good state of cultivation. In 1882 he formed a partnership with Mr. Parks and engaged in the hardware and general blacksmithing business. They carry a large stock of goods, and are also engaged extensively in manufacturing steel plows, for which there is a great demand.

Mr. Atkin served as presiding judge of the county court from 1878 to 1882, and proved himself to be a very efficient officer. In politics he ha always been a stanch Democrat. In 1850 Judge Akin married Catherine Emory, a native of the county, and a daughter of Charles W. Emory. She died in 1858, and he afterward married Louisa Lee, also a native of New Madrid County. This wife died in 1864. In 1865 the Judge was united in marriage with Elizabeth Emory, a sister of his first wife. Two daughters have been born to this union: Ola R. and Amanda M. The Judge and wife are consistent members of the Methodist Church. He is a Master Mason.

Seth S. Barnes
Page 888
Seth S. Barnes, one among the enterprising and business men of New Madrid, is a native of Ripley County, Ind., born on July 12, 1845. He is a son of Seth S. Barnes, Sr., a native of New York, who married Elizabeth Love, a native of Kentucky. After his marriage Seth S. Barnes, Sr., located on a farm in Ripley County, Ind., where he was afterward engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock dealing. He died in the spring of 1847. His wife died subsequently in Portsmouth, Ohio. When a lad of ten years, Seth S. Barnes, Jr., came to New Madrid County, Mo., and remained until 1859. On December 25, 1862, he enlisted in the United States navy under Commander James P. Foster of the steamer "Chilicothe," and iron-clad gunboat on the Mississippi River.

Mr. Barnes served on this vessel until the close of the war. He participated in all of its engagements in the work of opening up the Mississippi. Out of 130 men that enlisted he was one of twenty-five who were mustered out of service, the others having been killed, wounded or discharged for disability. He was discharged at Mound City, Ill., in June, 1865, after which he located in Henderson County, that State. In September, 1866, he was united in marriage with Miss Laura Marston, a native of Henderson County, Ill., and a daughter of Nathaniel Marston. Mr. Barnes was engaged in farming in that county till the spring of 1872, when he returned to New Madrid County, Mo., and located on a farm in New Madrid Township, which he had purchased in 1869. In 1881 he removed to New Madrid and engaged in the mercantile business, and was also appointed postmaster, which office he resigned on account of poor health after serving two years.

He sold a one-half interest in his store and, leaving the business to his partner, returned to his farm in 1883 and remained until 1886, when he returned to the city and again took charge of his store. On January 15, 1888, his store, merchandise and household goods, were entirely destroyed by fire, a loss of $8,000; but soon after he built one of the best business houses in the town, and now carries an extensive stock of groceries and implements. Mr. and Mrs. Barnes have four children: William, Charles, Mabel and Cora. Mrs. Barnes and three of the children are members of the Presbyterian Church. In politics Mr. Barnes has always supported the principles and measures of the Republican party.

Benjamin F. Boyce
Page 889
Judge Benjamin F. Boyce was born in Cape Girardeau County, Mo., March 21, 1817, and is a son of Thomas B. Boyce, a native of Delaware, who was reared in Georgia. When a young man Thomas B. Boyce came to Cape Girardeau County, Mo., where he married Susanna Davis, a native of Georgia. He resided in that county until 1821, when he removed to New Madrid County, where he purchased land and improved a farm on which he resided until his death on February 17, 1851. His wife died in 1846. Benjamin F. Boyce grew to manhood on his father's farm, and was married in New Madrid County in 1839 to Nancy Sikes, a native of the county and a daughter of Needham Sikes, formerly from South Carolina.

After his marriage Judge Boyce located on a farm in the northern part of New Madrid County, in Big Prairie Township, where he resided till 1867, when he removed to New Madrid. He was appointed to the position of sheriff and collector in 1866, re-appointed in 1867, and elected in 1868. His wife died in 1866. At the expiration of his term of office as sheriff and collector he was elected judge of the probate court, and in 1876 was appointed assessor of the county. In 1878 he was re-elected to the office of probate judge, and again re-elected in 1881 and 1886, being the present incumbent. He has held other minor offices, was elected county judge in 1850 and served eight years. To him and wife were born eight children, four of whom are dead: John B., who died after reaching maturity, and four that died in infancy. Those living are Susan E. (Mrs. Sam S. Watson), Marcy C. (Mrs. Joseph D. Cresat, of Sikeston, Mo.), and Alfred. The Judge is a member of the Point Pleasant Masonic lodge, and is a Master Mason. He is a man of strong constitution and never experienced any serious illness in his life time.

Henry E. Broughton
Page 890
Henry E. Broughton was born in New Madrid County, Mo., September 26, 1856, and is a son of Edward C. Broughton, who, when a small boy, came to New Madrid County with his father. Here he grew to manhood and married Elizabeth J. Lewis, a native of the county and a daughter of Lilbourn Lewis, one of the early settlers of New Madrid County. Mr. Broughton was a farmer, and also engaged in merchandising for a few years. He held the office of county assessor for one term. His death occurred January 30, 1867. His widow survives. Henry E. Broughton grew to manhood on his father's farm. Besides his business education, which he received at Jones' Commercial College, St. Louis, he is mostly self educated.

After finishing his commercial course he engaged as clerk and bookkeeper for T. J. Diggs at the warehouse in New Madrid, and continued until 1887, when he purchased an interest in the New Madrid Milling Company. He has since superintended the business of the company which operates an extensive corn mill in New Madrid. Mr. Broughton has served one term as county assessor, and has held several city offices. On January 12, 1886, his marriage with Miss Clara Mott was celebrated. She is a native of New Madrid County, and a daughter of John A. Mott. [see sketch.] Mr. Broughton is a member of the A. O. U. W., and is foreman of his lodge. His wife is a member of the Catholic Church.

William Dawson
Page 891 and 892
Hon. William Dawson, one of the most prominent citizens of New Madrid, Mo., was born in New Madrid County on March 17, 1848. His grandfather, Dr. Robert D. Dawson, was among the prominent men who early settled in Missouri. He was a native of Maryland, where he grew to mature years and studied medicine. Having come to New Madrid about 1800 he was one of the pioneer physicians of the district, in which he practiced his profession until his death.

Dr. Dawson was a member of the convention that drafted the first constitution of the State of Missouri. His son, Thomas H. Dawson, was born and reared in New Madrid County, and married Miss A. H. Laforge, a native of the county and a daughter of Peter A. Laforge. Peter A. Laforge was of French birth and parentage, and was an early settler of New Madrid. [A sketch of the Laforge family is given in another portion of this work.] After his marriage Thomas H. Dawson located on a farm in his native county, where he reared his family and still resides. For a short time he served in the Confederate army as lieutenant. William Dawson grew to manhood on his father's farm and in school. He is a graduate of the Christian Brothers' College, of St. Louis. during his last year of study in that institution he taught some, and after completing the course remained one year as a teacher, and in the meantime commenced reading law.

Returning home, he was elected sheriff and collector of the county in the fall of 1870, and was re-elected in 1872. At the general election in 1878 Mr. Dawson was elected to represent New Madrid County in the Legislature, he was re-elected in 1880 and 1882. After serving three terms in the Legislature he was admitted to the bar in New Madrid, and engaged in practicing his profession. In 1884 he again entered the political field, and was nominated and elected to represent the Fourteenth Congressional District of Missouri in Congress. He made this race against one of the strongest and most prominent Republicans of the district, and was elected by a large majority, and afterward filled the position with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents.

In New Madrid on December 24, 1874, he was united in marriage with Miss Ella Hunter, a native of the county, and a daughter of William W. Hunter, one of the pioneer merchants of New Madrid. Mrs. Dawson was educated at Linwood College, St. Charles, Mo. To them were born four children: Nellie, Thomas H. (who died in infancy), William and Birdie May. Mr. Dawson is a member of the New Madrid Masonic Lodge and is a Master Mason.

George Dawson
Page 892
George Dawson, M. D., a physician and surgeon of New Madrid, Mo., was born in New Madrid County on March 12, 1852, and is a son of Thomas H. Dawson [see sketch on Hon. William Dawson]. Dr. George Dawson grew to manhood in his native county, and secured a good education at the Christian Brothers' College, St. Louis. He did not, however, complete the course in that institution, but returned home and began studying medicine under Dr. Waters, now deceased, one of the leading  physicians of Southeast Missouri. After reading one year he entered the Louisville Medical College in the fall of 1873, and graduated from that institution in the spring of 1876. After completing the course, he returned to New Madrid, and commenced the practice of his profession, which he has continued, and now has a large and increasing practice. He is a young  man, of good habits and character, and keeps himself well-informed in the advanced ideas of his profession by reading carefully the medical journals and literature of the day. Dr. Dawson married in New Madrid, in the spring of 1882, Mary D. Howard, a native of the county and a daughter of Judge Howard [see sketch]. Mrs. Dawson is a member of the Catholic Church. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and is one of the examining physicians of his lodge. To the Doctor and Mrs. Dawson have been born three: Agate, Thomas H., and J. Doyne. 


Thomas H. Digges
Page 893
Thomas H. Digges, proprietor of the New Madrid, Mo., warehouse, is a native of Culpeper County, Va., born June 13, 1841. He is a son of C. W. Digges, a native of Fauquier County, Va., who grew to manhood in his native county, and married Elizabeth McClannagan, a New York lady, after which he located in Culpeper County, Va. Later he returned to his native county, and resided until his death, at Warrenton, about 1870. He held the office of sheriff of his county one or more terms. Thomas H. remained with his parents until he attained his majority, and received a good education in the high schools. In 1867 he came to New Madrid, Mo., and locating at New Madrid, was engaged as clerk on a wharf-boat for five years. In the spring of 1872, he was united in marriage with Lizzie Laforge, a native of the county, and a daughter of A. A. Laforge, one of the pioneers of Southeast Missouri.

After his marriage Mr. Digges removed to Moberly, Mo., and engaged in the grocery business, which he continued until 1875, when he returned to New Madrid and engaged in his present business in the warehouse. He also owns a two-third interest in the New Madrid Milling Company. In politics he supports the principles of the Democratic party. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate army, and was assigned to the Fourth Virginia Cavalry, under Gen. Stewart, and was a member of the company known as the Black Horse Cavalry. For about eighteen months he was on detached duty as general's courier. He was in the following engagements: First and second battles at Manassas; Chancellorsville; Seven Days fight and Stewart's raid around McClellan's army. At the close of the war his colonel surrendered with Lee's army. Mr. and Mrs. Digges have three: William L., Agnes and Lemuel. Mr. Digges is a member of the A. O. U. W. Mrs. Digges is a zealous member of the Catholic Church.

Milton G. Hatcher
page 895 and 896
Milton G. Hatcher, M. D., a druggist and physician of New Madrid, Mo., was born in Todd County, Ky., on October 14, 1840, and is a son of C. H. and Ann W. (Gill) Hatcher, both natives of Todd County, Ky. In 1856 the family removed to Illinois, and located in Madison County, where C. H. Hatcher died. Mrs. Hatcher is now residing in Kentucky. Milton G. grew to manhood in Illinois and received a liberal literary education at Shurtliff College. He commenced the study of medicine in 1859 under the direction of Dr. Howe, one of leading physicians of Bunker Hill, Ill. In 1860 he entered the Michigan University at Ann Arbor, and graduated in the medical department in 1863.

After completing his course he commenced practicing his profession at Edwardsville, Ill., continuing until 1870. In the winter of 1870 he removed to Missouri and located at New Madrid, where he continued practicing medicine. Three years later he engaged in the drug business, and in 1874 abandoned his practice so far as riding was required, but continues to give prescriptions. He has a neat store, carries a full stock of everything in the drug line, including paints, oils, books, etc., and has a good business. The Doctor was married at Marine, Ill., on October 1, 1863, to Mamie Fergurson, a native of Illinois and a daughter of Col. John L. Fergurson (deceased). Her mother is still living. Dr. Hatcher is a member of the A. O. U. W. In politics he is a Democrat, and has served one term as mayor of New Madrid.

James H. Howard
Page 896 and 897
Judge James H. Howard, one of the most prominent citizens and business men of New Madrid, Mo., was born in Hardinsburg, Ky., September 11, 1824. His father, William Howard, was a native of Kentucky, where he grew to manhood and married Rhoda Atkinson, also a native of that State. Both parents died in Kentucky when James H. was a child. The latter located in New Madrid, Mo., in 1845, and worked at his trade, that of gunsmith, for nine years. During that time he had gained the confidence and esteem of the citizens of the county, who, in 1856, elected him sheriff and collector, and re-elected him at the expiration of his first term. Since that time Judge Howard has held many official positions of trust and honor, all of which he has filled with credit to himself and satisfaction of his constituents.

He was county treasurer for several terms, and presiding judge of the county court for four years. In 1863 he engaged in the mercantile business, and built the block now owned and occupied by his firm. On the organization of the Agricultural Wheel in New Madrid County, this firm was selected to manage the Wheeler store, since which time they have built up a large trade and have an enviable reputation for fair dealing. Judge Howard has been three times married. He was first married in 1848, and his wife died a few months later. In October, 1850, in New Madrid County, he was married to Elizabeth Byrne, a native of the county. She died in May, 1865, leaving six children, all of whom are living. Judge Howard married his present wife, Mrs. Mary E. Philips, on June 6, 1876. Mrs. Howard is an earnest member of the Catholic Church.

Luke B. Howard
Page 897
Luke B. Howard was born in New Madrid County, Mo., October 6, 1851, and is a son of Judge J. H. Howard [see sketch]. Luke B. Howard was reared at his father's home, and received a good education, which was begun in the common schools and finished at St. Vincent's College, Cape Girardeau, and the Christian Brothers' College, St. Louis. He spent about two years in the store with his father, and in 1872 located on his present farm, one mile north of New Madrid. He owns 290 acres, and an interest in 400 acres besides most all of which he is cultivating. The farm is beautifully situated, and has upon it a good residence and one of the best barns in the county. November 23, 1874, Mr. Howard was united in marriage with Lena A. Dawson, a native of New Madrid County, Mo., and a daughter of G. W. Dawson, deceased. To them have been born six children, viz.: Anna, Lena, Mary T., Jennie, Dixie and Ruth. Mr. Howard is a member of the A. O. U. W. of New Madrid. His wife is a member of the Catholic Church.

Edward J. Hudson
Page 897
Edward J. Hudson, proprietor of Hudson Hotel, New Madrid, Mo., is a native of Maury County, Tenn., born November 30, 1832. He is a son of Greenup and Mary (Dortch) Hudson, natives of North Carolina and Virginia, respectively. The parents removed with their family to Southern Illinois in 1839, and located on a farm in Massac County, where they remained until their deaths. Edward J. grew to manhood in Illinois, and learned the cooper's trade, of which he worked until the beginning of the Civil War. However, he had removed to Missouri in 1857. On June 22, 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate army as second sergeant in the First Missouri Infantry, under Col. John S. Bowen, with which he served until he was paroled, on May 22, 1865. He served on detached duty several times, and participated in the following engagements: Shiloh, Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, Nashville, Champion's Hill, siege and surrender of Vicksburg, Corinth, and all the engagements of the Georgia campaign with Hood and Johnson. He was wounded at the battle of Peach Tree Creek, in front of Atlanta, and was confined in hospital about six weeks, after which he returned to his company and was in the battle of Franklin and Fort Blakely, where the entire army was captured.

Mr. Hudson made his escape by swimming to a Confederate gunboat one and one-quarter miles away. Returning home in August, 1865, he went to Fayette County, Tenn., and remained two years, engaged in merchandising. In 1868 he went to Pope County, Ill., where he followed his trade until 1872, when he came to New Madrid. Since then he has been engaged in merchandising and various other branches of business. In 1885 he purchased the house he now occupies and engaged in the hotel business. The house stands on the bank of the river, and is said to be the oldest one in the county. It is known as the Powell homestead, and stands on its original site. It has been repaired and received additions, but the old part, built of hewn cypress logs, is as sound as when first erected. Mr. Hudson was married on March 4, 1883, to Mrs. Anse Dell Hall, a native of Kentucky, who was reared and educated in New Madrid. Mr. Hudson is an ancient member of the I. O. O. F.

Henry C. Latham
Page 899
Henry C. Latham, treasurer of New Madrid County, Mo., is a native of Montgomery County, Tenn., born November 14, 1831. He is a son of Bryan Latham, who was born and reared in North Carolina, and married Mary J. Smith, also a native of the Old North State. Bryan Latham removed to Tennessee about 1824, and located in Montgomery County, where he resided until his death in 1864. His widow survived him several years, and died in 1882. Henry C. grew to manhood in his native county and came to Missouri in 1858. Locating at Point Pleasant he engaged as clerk in a drug store, in which he learned the drug business. He remained at Point Pleasant for six years, and in the meantime studied medicine under Dr. D. S. Newell.

In 1864 he came to New Madrid and entered a drug store as prescription clerk, but the next year engaged in the business in partnership with Dr. Waters, with whom he remained several years. In 1874 Mr. Latham formed a partnership with Mr. Lewis, and engaged in the drug business, at which they have been very successful. They have a neat store and do a large business. Politically Dr. Latham is a Democrat, and was elected county treasurer in 1884, and re-elected in 1886. In 1861 he was united in marriage with Christine Lesieur, a descendant of one of the oldest families of New Madrid County. To them have been born three children, daughters, all of whom are at home. In religious faith the family are earnest Catholics.

Lilbourn A. Lewis
Page 901 and 902
Lilbourn A. Lewis, prosperous merchant of New Madrid, Mo., is a native of the county, born on October 4, 1843. He is a son of Lilbourn Lewis, a native of Albemarle County, Va., who went to Kentucky in 1812. He came to Missouri about 1830 and located in New Madrid County, on Lewis Prairie. After coming to Missouri he married Hannah R. Hayden, a native of Cape Girardeau County. He resided on his farm, engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death in 1876. Lilbourn A. Lewis grew to manhood on his father's farm, and has secured most of his education since arriving at mature years by reading and private study. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate army, joining Col. Bowen's regiment, First Missouri Infantry, with which he served until the fall of Vicksburg in 1863. During the most of the time he served as the colonel's orderly.

After the fall of Vicksburg he joined Forrest's cavalry and remained with them until the fall of 1864, when he was captured in Lake County, Tenn., and held prisoner at St. Louis until almost the close of the war. Upon his release he returned home and was engaged in farming in New Madrid County until 1875, when he formed a partnership with H. C. Latham and engaged in the drug business, which he has continued. He also engaged in the hardware business in 1880, it being the first general hardware store in New Madrid; to this he added, the first of January, 1888, a stock of groceries. He carries a large and complete stock of goods and controls a good trade. He was married in Lake County, Tenn., on January 3, 1866, to Miss S. C. Merriwether, a daughter of A. G. Merriwether, a brother of Gov. Merriwether. She died in March, 1874, leaving two sons, L. G. and Winston. Mr. Lewis was married in January, 1878, to Miss Emma Laforge, a native of the county, and a daughter of A. A. Laforge. Two children have been born to them, Lottie and Freddie. Mrs. Lewis is a member of the Catholic Church. Mr. Lewis is a member of the A. O. U. W. 

Arthur G. Mathewson
Page 902
Arthur G. Mathewson, an enterprising and prosperous merchant of the firm of Mathewson & Co., New Madrid, Mo., was born in Providence, R. I., on March 16, 1851. He is a son of Charles E. A. and Eliza (Gilbert) Mathewson, natives of Rhode Island and New York respectively. Charles E. A. Mathewson served through the late war as orderly sergeant in the Fifth Rhode Island Infantry, and participated in all engagements of his regiment. Both he and his wife died in Rhode Island. Arthur G. remained in his native city until he was sixteen years of age, and had the advantage of its schools. In 1867 he went to Ohio, and spent about three years on a farm in Warren and Greene Counties. In the fall of 1869 he went via St. Louis to Arkansas, where he spent the winter of 1869-70. In the spring of 1870 he came to New Madrid, and was engaged on a farm and as clerk in a store until 1873, when he was appointed deputy postmaster, which position he held until 1874, when he went to Jackson, Mo., and remained three years clerking in a store.

Returning to New Madrid in 1877, he was married on February 14 of the next year to Lizzie Roth, a native of the county, and a daughter of Jacob Roth, deceased. Upon his return he took his old position as assistant postmaster, and also established the Southeast Chronicle, which paper he published about three years, serving in the postoffice until September 15, 1884. He then, in partnership with Joseph Hunter, purchased his present business, in which he carries a large stock of furniture, lumber, shingles, brick, and also conducts an undertaking  business. Mr. Mathewson united with the Presbyterian Church in 1871, and has since been elected one of the ruling elders of the church. His wife is a member of the same church. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and has twice represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge of Missouri. To him and wife have been born four children: Truman (who died when one year and fifty weeks old), Mabel, Harriet, Pearl and Gilbert Roth. Politically Mr. Mathewson is a Democrat, and was elected school commissioner in 1887.

Charles L. Mitchell
Page 903
Charles L. Mitchell, a young man of sterling worth and character, was born at Fort Adams, Wilkerson Co., Miss., August 9, 1858. His father Alex B. Mitchell, was born at Chillicothe, Ohio, where he grew to manhood. After reaching maturity he engaged in merchandising on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, having run as many as sixteen merchant boats. In New Madrid County, Mo., he married Carrie Lavallee, a native of the county, and a daughter of Charles A. Lavallee, an early pioneer of New Madrid District. The latter's father, Don Juan Lavallee, had command of the post of New Madrid under the Spanish Government, for a short time. After his marriage Mr. Mitchell located at Fort Adams, Miss., where he was in business until his death in 1860, whereupon Mrs. Mitchell returned to her father, who was an extensive planter in New Madrid County. She, later, married F. W. Maulsby, who was serving as clerk of New Madrid County at the time of his death in July, 1881. Charles L. Mitchell's youth was spent on the farm and in school. He clerked in a dry goods house  about five years, and at the age of twenty years his step-father made him his deputy, which position he held until the death of the latter.

In 1882 Mr. Mitchell himself received the nomination for county clerk, and was elected without opposition, being re-elected in 1886, and is now serving his second term in a most satisfactory manner. On November 9, 1886, he was united in marriage with Miss Jennie Watson, a native of Litchfield, Ill., where she was reared and educated. She is a daughter of H. C. Watson (deceased), formerly a resident of New Madrid County, who removed to Illinois in 1860, and came back to New Madrid County, Mo., in the fall of 1885, and remained until his death in the spring of 1886. His father, Judge Robert G. Watson, was one of the earliest pioneers of this section. Mr. Mitchell is a member of the A. O. U. W.  

John A. Mott
Page 903 and 904
John A. Mott, clerk and recorder of the circuit court of New Madrid County, was born in Nicholasville, Jessamine Co., Ky., on September 5, 1826. He is a son of James Mott, a native of Virginia, who went to Jessamine County, Ky., when a young man, in 1815. There he married Hettie Withers, a native of the county. He was a farmer and merchant, and in 1828 removed to Hickman, Ky., and remained there engaged in the mercantile business until his death in 1847. John A. grew to manhood in Hickman and spent his youth in school and in his father's store. In 1850 he went to California, via New Orleans, Panama and Aspinwall; and, after spending two years in the mines, returned home by the same route. He came to New Madrid in October, 1852, and remained one year, when he went to Illinois and was appointed route agent for the American Express Company, with headquarters at Chicago.

He resigned the position in 1856, and came back to New Madrid, and was married in November of that year to H. J. Waggener, a native of the county, and a daughter of Robert G. and Zelia Waggener, who were among the early settlers of the county from Virginia. After his marriage Mr. Mott resided one year in New York City in the mercantile business, and in 1857 returned to Chicago in the employ of the American Express Company; but, after one year longer, came back to New Madrid. He engaged in farming until he was appointed by Gov. Gamble clerk and recorder of the circuit court. He was next appointed by Gov. Fletcher, and was elected at the first general election, and has been re-elected at each consecutive election with a nice majority each time but one, when he had but sixteen more than his opponent. He has held the office twenty-five consecutive years in a manner most satisfactory to all. He has also held several offices in the city. In 1875 he was licensed as an attorney at law, but has never practiced. To him and wife have been born six children: Clara, Laura, Louis W., May, Richard J. and Robert. Mr. Mott is a member of the Masonic order.

Lee C. Phillips
Page 906 and 907
Lee C. Phillips was born in Jefferson County, near Louisville, Ky., on December 29, 1859, and is a son of Capt. Thomas Phillips, who was born and reared in Kentucky. The latter came to Missouri when a young man about 1855, and was married in New Madrid County to Ann H. Maulsby, a native of the county. Thomas J. Phillips enlisted in the Confederate army, and was made captain of his company, with which he served until 1864. Upon his return from the war, he removed to Kentucky and located in Jefferson County. He engaged in agricultural pursuits, but after two years returned to New Madrid County, Mo., and in February, 1866, located on the farm on which his family now resides. He remained here engaged in farming until his death, on June 17, 1872.

After returning to New Madrid County he was county surveyor for a number of years, and was serving in this capacity at the time of his death. He left a family of four children - two sons and two daughters - three of whom are living: Lee C., Dr. Murray W. (a dentist in New Madrid) and Mamie. Lee C. was reared on his father's farm, and received an ordinary education in the common schools. Since reaching manhood he has managed the home farm, containing 280 acres, which is somewhat below the average fertility of land in New Madrid County. Two hundred and sixty acres are in cultivation. He owns one-fourth share of the farm, which is moderately improved. On January 5, 1887, he was united in marriage to Miss Neelie Waters, a daughter of Louis A. Waters, Sr., and Vaginia Waters (both deceased). Mr. Phillips is a member of the A. O. U. W. His wife is a devoted member of the Catholic Church. Her mother was also a devout member of the same church. Mr. and Mrs. Phillips are the parents of one son, Edwin. 

Murray Phillips
Page 906
Murray Phillips, a prominent citizen of Southeast Missouri, residing near New Madrid, was born near that city on January 19, 1847, and is a son of Shapley R. and Sallie (Graves) Phillips. Shapley R. Phillips was born at Louisville, Ky., on September 22, 1802, and when a young man came to New Madrid County, Mo., where he afterward resided. At the time of his location in the county, he possessed scanty means, but by energy and superior business ability he became one of the most wealthy and substantial men of Southeast Missouri. He seemed to be successful in all his undertakings, owning at one time 300 slaves, and between 7,000 to 10,000 acres of land. His attention was given entirely to farming, which he prosecuted on an extensive scale. He died on Lewis' Prairie on January 29, 1863.

His wife was born in East Tennessee, and died when the subject of this sketch was a young boy. There were eight children, of whom Murray is the youngest and only survivor. He received a fine education, first attending Christian Brothers' College of St. Louis, and later Washington University of Virginia, which was then under the management of Gen. Robert E. Lee. He graduated from the latter college in French and mathematics. After his father's death he lived with his elder brother, Amos R., a prominent citizen of New Madrid County, who was a representative at the time of his death in 1873. Amos R. was never married. Sallie D., a sister, was the wife of Leroy Kline. She died in 1865, leaving one son, Amos R., who has since had his name changed to Amos R. Phillips. In 1869 Murray Phillips took charge of his father's estate, in connection with which he now has charge of his brother, Amos R., and Leroy Kline's estates. The Phillips estate comprises 15,000 acres of some of the best land in Southeast Missouri. On August 10, 1876, Mr. Phillips was united in marriage with Anna M. Howard, a daughter of J. H. Howard, of New Madrid. Their union has been blessed by the birth of one son, Murray.

Philip Raidt
page 908
Judge Philip Raidt was born in Beal, on the Necker, in Wurtemberg, Germany, April 4, 1825, and is a son of Remegious and Antonia (Hanely) Raidt, who were also born in Germany, where they were reared and married. They immigrated to America in February, 1833 (the father resigning his office of burgomaster of Beal), and landed in New Orleans some time in May of that year. Then the father embarked for St. Louis on the steamer "Mohegan," but on account of the severity of the cholera was forced to abandon the boat, owing to slow speed and time occupied in burying people. Mr. Raidt, Sr., stopped, as he thought, temporarily at New Madrid, but it proved to be a permanent step. Two of his daughters died on the boat and were buried between New Orleans and New Madrid, and one died soon after landing.

After living in town until the next spring he purchased some land and moved on a farm, where he died in a short time. This farm was about two and half miles from New Madrid at that time but is now about one and a half miles distant, by reason of the wash and caving-in of the banks of the Mississippi River. Philip Raidt grew to manhood on the farm, and was married in 1848 to Rosie Thomas, a native of Germany, who came to America in the same vessel with the Raidt family. After his marriage the Judge remained on the farm until 1866, when he removed to New Madrid to give his children the advantages of the school of that city. He has three children: Barbara (wife of Louis Newbeaur, whose sketch appears in the work), Elizabeth (a young lady at home) and Philip A. (who now has charge of his father's farm). Since removing to New Madrid Mr. Raidt has served as school director two or three terms, and helped to organize the first free school in this county. He has also served as alderman on the city board for a few terms. In April, 1884, he was elected mayor of the city of New Madrid without any solicitation on his part, but did not serve, as his services were otherwise required in attending to duties about his farm. In the fall of 1884 he became a candidate for judge of the county court, from the first district of New Madrid County, and was elected in November, 1884, and was re-elected in November, 1886, which office he now holds.

Amos Riley
Page 908 and 909
Judge Amos Riley, one of the prominent citizens of New Madrid County, Mo., was born in Jefferson County, Ky., on June 10, 1810. He is a son of Amos Riley, Sr., a native of Montgomery County, Md. The latter when a young man left his native State and went to Jefferson County, Ky., where he married Susan Philips, a native of Virginia. Some years after their marriage they removed to Daviess County, Ky., where they spent the remainder of their lives. Amos Riley, Jr., grew to manhood in Daviess County, Ky., and was married in Louisville on December 23, 1833, to Lucy Ann Hamilton, a daughter of Charles Hamilton, of Claiborne County, Miss., in which county Mrs. Riley was born. After his marriage Mr. Riley located in Kentucky, but in 1837 came to Southeast Missouri and purchased 300 acres of land, where he now resides. He brought his family to this farm in 1844. Since then he has purchased more land (all timbered), which he has improved, and after giving liberally to his children, still has about 600 acres. He has served as judge of the county court, and is one of the substantial men of the county. He and wife have reared a family of six sons and two daughters, viz.: Charles H., Amos C. (who was killed in the Confederate army at Atlanta, Ga.), William, Ellen (wife of Amos R. Hathaway), Henry C., E. T. Chilion (now in New Mexico), Lucy (wife of J. D. Harrel, of Jackson, Mo.) and D. B. (who is now managing the home farm). Judge Riley is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and his wife of the Presbyterian Church.

William Riley
Page 909
William Riley was born in Jefferson County, Ky., December 20, 1840, and when four years of age, came to Missouri with his father, Amos Riley, who settled in New Madrid County [see sketch of latter]. William grew up on his father's farm, and secured a good education at the Military Institute, near Frankfort, Ky., and the State University at Columbia, Mo. He enlisted in the Confederate army in 1861 at the beginning of the war, joining the First Missouri Infantry as a private, but was soon after promoted to the rank of first lieutenant. He served on year in that regiment and re-enlisted in 1862 in the Eighth Missouri Cavalry, with which he served until the close of the war. He enlisted the second time as a private and was again promoted to first lieutenant.

He participated in all the engagements of his regiment, not being away from his command more than a month from the beginning to the end of the war. The most prominent battles were Shiloh, Helena, and Pilot Knob. When peace was restored he returned home, and has since been engaged in farming. He was married in October, 1867, to Orra Toney, a native of New Madrid County, and a daughter of Pinkney Toney, deceased. He located on the farm where he now resides, three and one-half miles north of New Madrid, in 1871. The farm consists of 210 acres of fine land, nearly all fenced and under cultivation. To him and wife have been born eight children: Lydia C., Amos C., Nannie D., Charles V., Mabel O., William, Chilion and John M. Mr. Riley is a member of the A. O. U. W. lodge at New Madrid.

Henry C. Riley
Page 909
Henry C. Riley, prosecuting attorney of New Madrid County, Mo., is a native of the county, born December 18, 1850, and is a son of Judge Amos Riley [see sketch]. Henry C. Riley spent his youth on his father's farm and at school. He received his literary education in a five years' course at the Kentucky Military Institute, near Frankfort, Ky., graduating from the institution in June, 1871. He then entered the St. Louis Law School, from which he received a diploma in 1873.

After finishing his professional education he commenced practicing at New Madrid, and has become one of the leading lawyers of the county. He served as county school commissioner for a few years. In 1884 he was elected prosecuting attorney for the county, and was re-elected in 1886. He was united in marriage in May, 1877, with Miss Jennie Howard, a native of the county, and a daughter of Judge J. H. Howard [see sketch]. She was reared in New Madrid County and educated at St. Vincent Female Seminary at Cape Girardeau. Mr. and Mrs. Riley's union has been blessed by the birth of three, viz.: Edwin H., Harry C. and Dixie. Mr. Riley is a member of the Masonic order, and also of the A. O. U. W. Mrs. Riley is a devoted member of the Catholic Church.

Madison Jackson Tickell
Page 912 and 913
Madison Jackson Tickell, a prominent citizen of New Madrid County, was born in White County, Tenn., on July 16, 1826. He is the sixth of eleven children born to William and Lavinia (Stallcup) Tickell, natives of Rockingham County, N. C., and of Scotch-Irish and German lineage, respectively. Probably soon after their marriage, they removed to White County, Tenn., and in 1836 to Obion County, that State, where they remained several years, and went to Hickman County and resided till their deaths. William Tickell was a successful farmer, but lost much money by going security for his friends. He had no political aspirations, and he and wife were for many years zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, always taking an active part in church affairs.

Of their eleven children, nine lived to be grown and four are living at this writing: Madison Jackson, Elizabeth C. (the widow of Daniel Mozier, deceased), Sallie Louisa (who is married and resides in Arkansas), Martha Caroline (widow of Mr. Pierce, deceased). Madison J. received a limited education in Tennessee, as opportunity for schooling was meager at the time. Since coming to New Madrid County, Mo., he has attended school three months, and by much reading and close observation has gained a good practical education. At the age of sixteen years, he began driving a team for his father from Hickman, Ky., into the interior of the State about 100 miles, hauling goods from the Mississippi River, and in return bringing cotton and tobacco. He continued this for three years, and a few months before he was twenty-one years of age left home, paying his father $20 for his liberty. He took a trip on the Mississippi River to New Orleans, and across Lake Pontchartrain to Mobile, Ala. In May, 1847, he returned to New Madrid, and began learning the carpenter's trade, at which he afterward worked for fifteen years, and continued twenty-five years more in connection with house-moving. Being very successful at his trade he then began dealing in stock, the most of which he shipped to New Orleans, and the rest to St. Louis.

He is still engaged in this business, and has been farming extensively for many years, owning at present 3,000 acres of fine land. Immediately after the war he cultivated 100 acres on the site of the present town of New Madrid, for which land he paid $6 per acre rent. In 1847 he married Mrs. Anise (Audibert) Roy, a native of France, who came with her parents to the United States when small, and first located near New Albany, Ind., but later came to New Madrid County, Mo. To Mr. and Mrs. Tickell have been born four children, three living: Mary Eliza (wife of Henry Clay Hunter), Louis Alfred (who is engaged very successfully at house-moving), William Adolph (who is merchandising at LaForge). The other one, Laura, died when three years of age. Mrs. Tickell is a member of the Catholic Church. Mr. Tickell is a very active, public-spirited citizen, and at all times supports the cause of education, and he and family are highly respected by all who know them.

Edward A. Wright
Page 914
Edward A. Wright, editor and publisher of the Weekly Record, of New Madrid, Mo., was born in St. Louis, on December 2, 1856. His father, Erie Wright, was a native of Massachusetts, and was an architect, contractor and builder in St. Louis, for a number of years. He was married in that city to Louisa Cruchon, a native of France, who was reared and educated in St. Louis. Erie Wright continued his business in St. Louis till his death at Camp Jackson during the war. After the death of her husband Mrs. Wright removed to Jackson, Cape Girardeau County, where she has since resided. Edward A. Wright grew to manhood at Jackson and Cape Girardeau. When a lad of sixteen years he commenced learning the printer's trade in the office of the Cash Book, at Jackson. He continued there until he became a practical printer, and afterward worked at his trade in other offices of that county until he became a skillful job printer.

In 1881 he came to New Madrid and took charge of the Weekly Record, as editor and publisher. The paper at that time was a small sheet, a five-column patent outside, with a very limited circulation. Mr. Wright has succeeded in making it a six-column quarto, which has a good patronage in its advertising columns, and a large circulation. The paper is now a credit to its editor and to New Madrid County. Mr. Wright was married in this city in October, 1884, to Miss Cora Grover, who was born, reared and educated in Adams County, Ill. She is a daughter of Benjamin F. Grover, of that county. One son has blessed this union: Grover. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., and is recorder of his lodge, and is, also, clerk of the city council.